In many ways, lawn and garden care is right up there with automotive DIY detailing. You can obtain an infinite amount of products, tools, and chemicals, but without a little creativity and a handful of cheats and hacks on hand, possessing the perfect lawn is virtually impossible.

However, cutting the grass and maintaining a natural landscape requires more than a few hacks and some weed killer as well. Patience, practice, knowledge, and some well-selected lawn care tools all play a vital role in yard control. Unfortunately, the latter of this lot tends to cause its own headaches, as outdoor lawn and garden equipment does not always work as intended, especially after years of use and abuse.

Just type the words: “mower, string trimmer, or lawnmowers” in a search engine box, and you’ll receive a slew of the most commonly researched issues and solutions for these commonplace grass-cutting lawn tools.  

Questions start simple, with inquiries like, “Can you cut grass with a string trimmer?”  and move onward to, “So exactly how DO you cut grass with a string trimmer?”

But perhaps one of the most common lawn care questions is, “How to keep wet grass from sticking to a mower or string trimmer?”

A quality 9H-rated nano ceramic coating has the ability to provide the answer to this “sticky situation,” as it makes lawn care both far more efficient and tidy. However, there are a few things you have to bear in mind if you plan on ceramic coating your lawnmower or weed whacker, and today we’ll discuss all of them.

Why Mowers and String Trimmers Need Ceramic Coating Products

A properly maintained and protected mower will both work more efficiently, and allow easier aftercare. Photo Credit: Black+Decker
A properly maintained and protected mower will both work more efficiently, and allow easier aftercare. Photo Credit: Black+Decker

In order to keep tall grass and lawn care maintenance times alike under control, one must keep their string trimmers, push mowers, and riding lawnmowers in optimal working order, which is where ceramic coating steps in. But there’s an issue.

Since ceramic coating products that have been specifically engineered for weed whackers, new tractor blades, and mower deck top edges are virtually non-existent, a little research must first be put into play. Knowing what you are up against also isn’t such a bad idea either.

Experienced lawn care DIYers know that when it comes time to mow, wet grass, dead leaves, weeds, and all manner of muck coats everything south of the handle or steering wheel on lawn equipment. The trimmer head on weed eaters, as well as the blades and lower sections of a lawnmower deck are especially prone to getting clogged with this crap too.

However, most people are just looking for easy ways to keep grass from sticking to their lawnmower wheels, or are on the hunt for ways to protect the bottom of a mower deck from grass clippings and other forms of sticky organic matter build-up.

Traditionally, this translated to stopping whatever you were doing, grabbing the garden hose or pressure washer, and forcefully clearing out whatever debris had collected underneath your lawn care equipment. By ceramic coating a mower or string trimmer’s undercarriage, you not only avoid grass and organic debris build-up, but you also make clean-up a hell of a lot easier, and here’s why.

Meet Silver Cymbal and His DIY Homeowner Hacks

Silver Cymbal's YouTube home page is absolutely packed with useful tips, tricks, product tests, and more. Photo Credit: Silver Cymbal/YouTube
Silver Cymbal’s YouTube home page is absolutely packed with useful tips, tricks, product tests, and more. Photo Credit: Silver Cymbal/YouTube

In recent years, DIY experimentalists and tool aficionados, like YouTube freethinker “Silver Cymbal,” have become increasingly eager to test-out unorthodox products and put viewer suggested tricks and hacks to the test.

In Silver Cymbal’s case, this translates to the testing and reviewing of numerous lawn care products. To date, everything from standard issue cordless grass string trimmers and lawnmowers, to badass chainsaw blades intended for hardcore hedging and a “Turbo Boosted Backpack Mosquito Fogger Leaf Blower” have been put through their paces on his channel.

Lawn care may be one of those messy routine maintenance jobs that gets deemed as mandatory by most homeowners, but it shouldn't always have to require extensive clean-up. Photo Credit: Worx
Lawn care may be one of those messy routine maintenance jobs that gets deemed as mandatory by most homeowners, but it shouldn’t always have to require extensive clean-up. Photo Credit: Worx

That being said, despite the vast array of products and procedures at his disposal, Silver Cymbal’s goal has remained crystal clear for all these years: Create simple and informative video content, in order to illustrate how certain products and hacks can drastically improve efficiency levels and overall DIY satisfaction. Which is precisely why he decided to ceramic coat his push mower with a layer of AvalonKing’s Armor Shield IX nano coating.

Quick Nerd Note: You may recall “Silver Cymbal” from a blog feature we did a while back, where he created a super-slick, ceramic coated snow blower. Since then, Silver Cymbal has gone on to ceramic coat his work truck with Armor Shield IX, which he proceeded to stress-test via a 6 month no-wash moratorium.

So What Do I Spray On the Bottom of My Mower Deck?

CERAMIC COATING my LAWN MOWER to Make it NON-STICK

As tractor forum debates rage-on as to whether or not ceramic coating a mower deck is worth the time, money, energy, and resources, the evidence provided within Silver Cymbal’s video tells you everything you need to know. And yes, he did the right thing by testing identical mowers on the same lawn on the same day, with one being unprotected, and the other being ceramic coated with Armor Shield IX from AvalonKing.

Being that Silver Cymbal went all-in, and opted to test-out the highest rated consumer-grade nano ceramic coating product on the market, he did have to commit to some additional prep work in order for Armor Shield IX to function properly.

As Silver Cymbal’s video clearly illustrates, this extra level of prep care was ultimately worth it, as Armor Shield IX’s grass and moisture repelling capabilities easily offset its minor application requirements.

Ever seen a Honda CBR motorcycle-powered, 100-mph riding lawnmower before? Well you have now. The "Mean Mower" from Honda strikes a truly impressive balance between high-speed engineering and everyday functionality. Photo Credit: HondaPro Jason/YouTube
Ever seen a Honda CBR motorcycle-powered, 100-mph riding lawnmower before? Well you have now. The “Mean Mower” from Honda strikes a truly impressive balance between high-speed engineering and everyday functionality. Photo Credit: HondaPro Jason/YouTube

Another option (which Silver Cymbal has yet to explore), would be to apply an SiO2 ceramic boost spray to the mower deck and its various undercarriage components. When it comes to making surfaces slick, a high-grade spray-on SiO2 ceramic solution offers an outstanding balance between easy application and seasonal longevity. Just be sure that you buy a SiO2 ceramic spray with a high silica dioxide content, as milder formulas don’t repel jack-shit, and oftentimes last for little more than a few days.

Quick Nerd Note: Yes, you could apply a traditional car wax to your mower deck and even on the blades, but due to natural and synthetic wax’s weaker genetic make-up, they aren’t going to last very long. Plus, most forms of wax get super sticky when they get too hot, which could lead to more problems than solutions when summer mowing is in order.

Why a 9H-Rated Nano Ceramic Coating Works Best on a Mower or String Trimmer

AvalonKing Armor Shield IX nano ceramic coating is rated as the highest-grade DIY ceramic coat on the planet. Photo Credit: Silver Cymbal/ YouTube

When it comes to maintaining lawn and garden tools, like weed whackers and lawnmowers, ceramic coating their “nether regions” is one of the easiest things you can do to keep all of those wet grass clippings in the compost where they belong.

Regardless as to whether you prefer gas string trimmers, cordless string trimmers, a push mower, or an ornery old riding lawnmower named “Moose,” this space-age stuff has you and your landscaping power tools covered. 

It is the hydrophobic “lotus effect” found within high concentrations of silica dioxide, that make the nano-technology within a ceramic coating product like Armor Shield IX so strong and slick. This translates to virtually every imaginable form of contaminant and liquid bouncing off the coated surface, leaving behind little more than a dash of residue, and an easy-to-clean area.

How to Ceramic Coat a Line Trimmer or Lawnmower

When applying a nano ceramic coating to lawn equipment, a familiarity with the basic components of your string trimmer or mower can be crucial. Photo Credit: Black+Decker
When applying a nano ceramic coating to lawn equipment, a familiarity with the basic components of your string trimmer or mower can be crucial. Photo Credit: Black+Decker

May it be an electric model with multiple angular control settings and speeds, or a gas model with an internal combustion engine and additional petroleum power for that “cutting edge” finish, the lower sections of mowers and weed whackers are all fairly similar in design, and 100% ceramic coating friendly.

The prep and application process for these useful lawn tools is super simple too.

For preparation, all you have to do is hose-off and dry the area you wish to ceramic coat, then hit it with a high-grade isopropyl alcohol spray and a multi-purpose microfiber towel or two. For more stubborn residue, or heavily used older mowers, opt for a surface prep shampoo and a foam cannon cleaning approach, as that will really help lift filth and grime.

For installation, just coat the blades, mower deck, trimmer head, and any other ground-level portion of your grass and weed cutting power tools with either an SiO2-rich temp ceramic coating spray, or a far more permanent 9H-rated nano ceramic coating product. Once you see a rainbow hue appear, buff the coating away, and voila, it’s time to let the coating cure for a full 48 hours in your tool shed or garage prior to being put to use. 

Wet grass, tall grass, overgrown hedges, out-of-control garden veggies, weeds, that patch of weed growing behind your uncle’s house… it all slides off the underside of your string trimmer or high-dollar lawnmower faster than a Jamaican bobsled team hitting the luge at the 1988 Winter Olympic Games.

Parting Shots

A ceramic coated string trimmer will be far easier to clean, as the hydrophobic properties within the ceramic coating repels both wet and dry debris. Photo Credit: Makita
A ceramic coated string trimmer will be far easier to clean, as the hydrophobic properties within the ceramic coating repels both wet and dry debris. Photo Credit: Makita

In a world where improper lawn care techniques have far deeper consequences than previously presumed, being cognizant of what works best for you and your mowing equipment can make a massive difference in the amount of time and resources spent.

So while all of the commoners busy themselves with squabbling over the best method for cleaning and waxing a mower, those of us with distinguished taste, and a far more encompassing knowledge of landscaping, favor a far more advanced, silica dioxide supported methodology.

Oh my. Do you hear that? I believe that’s the sound of my ultra-clean, and rather famished mower, growling in hunger for its next vegetative meal. If you’ll excuse me…

If you enjoyed this article, then you'll love AvalonKing's automotive care products for Do-It-Yourselfers. We create "No B.S. products" for an affordable price. And the best part, we treat our customers like family, so if you have any questions or just looking to chat about cars, we're only an email or call away. Check out our homepage here.