[2022] Don't Buy a Ceramic Coating until you Read This!

[2022] Don't Buy a Ceramic Coating until you Read This!

10 Dumb and Dangerous Car Detailing Trends Reading [2022] Don't Buy a Ceramic Coating until you Read This! 18 minutes Next [2022 Guide] Best Shampoos for Ceramic Coated Cars?

In a perfect world, every car on the road would be eternally pristine, as if it had just rolled-off the assembly line. Unfortunately, we live in a world where no amount of washing or waxing can protect our vehicles from surface scratches, rock chips, paint stains, and UV ray fading.

Luckily, the advent of modern ceramic coating products has given car owners a major weapons upgrade in the war against the elements, as well as things like bird shit, acid rain, tree sap, oxidation, and more.

Now don’t get us wrong. A high-quality ceramic coating is not going to make your car bulletproof. But outside of body armor, which last we checked was both excruciatingly expensive and heavy as hell, nano ceramic coatings offer an impressive array of protection.

So unless you are outfitting your Unimog with a $100,000 aero armor, chances are a ceramic coating is going to be your next best bet, and here’s why…

 

What in the hell is ceramic coating?

Difference between Ceramic Coated and Non-Coated surfaces.

Uncoated surface = dirt and pollutants can sit in paint pores.

Ceramic coated surface = Dirt and pollutants cannot attack paint.

Unlike traditional coatings, which are typically concocted from polymer resins, a ceramic coating is silicon dioxide or silica (SiO2) based. Commonly derived from quartz crystals and sand, silica creates an invisible, extremely resilient “nanotechnology coating” when combined with elements like titanium dioxide, polysilazane, triethanolamine, water, and various other ingredients. Once cured atop a hard surface, this viscous liquid forms a crystal-clear shell, a product that is referred to as a nano ceramic coating, or ceramic coating for short.

Why is ceramic coating used on cars?

Automakers use ceramic coatings due to its superior heat, abrasion, chemical, H20, and impact resistance, making it the ideal protective sealant for many car components. From a car’s wheel hubs and undercarriage, to its engine bay and interior, this transparent ceramic spray coating is virtually everywhere.

That said, automakers typically don’t apply a ceramic protective layer to a vehicle’s paint, leaving ample room for product specialists like AvalonKing to step forward. So strap-in, pour a drink, and cue the superhero music, because we’re about to get nerdy ya’ll…

What’s with all of the online hype about ceramic coatings?

As with any new product to hit the market, there’s a lot of hype out there about ceramic car coatings, and a quick search online reinforces this statement. Videos show people throwing mud on their truck’s hood, just to watch it sheet-off, leaving a near spotless paint coating in its wake. Dig a bit deeper, and even more brutal ceramic coating tests surface, some of which are hard to fathom.

Naysayers are quick to comment too, either claiming that these videos have been staged, or that ceramic coatings are unlikely to work at all. Accompanying these skeptics are those who fear that applying a ceramic coating product will compromise their vehicle’s paint in some way, and that it is impossible to get 2 to 5 years worth of protection from a bottle that small. Don’t worry guys. It’s not the size. It’s how you use it.

In order to dispel these unfounded claims and unrealistic real world concerns, we have put together the following ceramic coating guide to both inform and inspire car owners. Nano ceramic coatings like Armor Shield IX aren’t some form of snake oil, or black magic in a bottle, we’ll leave that business to Ozzy Osbourne and his homemade hooch.

Most ceramic coatings are highly refined products that have been stringently lab tested and proven to work on most hard surfaces. The only catch is, there are a few things you need to understand before taking the plunge.

Know Your Ceramic Coating Options

Armor Shield ix in packaging with car. Ceramic coating about to be applied to car's paint surfaces.
A car eagerly awaits an Armor Shield IX ceramic coating, which will help give it a mirror-like shine, unrivaled scratch and swirl resistance, and water-repelling hydrophobic properties.

When broken down to its bare bones, you’ll find that there are but two common ceramic coating products: “Professionally Applied Products” and “DIY Consumer Kits.” While both approaches provide a protective layer of nano coating, they vary greatly in regard to both price and the amount of prep time involved.

Despite their popularity in the professional car detailing sector, ceramic coating costs have just recently begun to reach a point where they are financially feasible on a DIY level. Just like there are varying quality levels of sushi (just say no to gas station sushi), not every ceramic coating is created equal.

Professional Grade Ceramic Coatings

Cost: $500 – $3,000

A pro ceramic coating product is an ultra high-end sealant that must be applied by highly skilled, certified professionals. This translates to the need for controlled environments, expensive equipment, and highly trained staff members, which in turn, translates to extremely high installation costs.

Although a $500 intro price for the application of the ceramic coating itself may seem tempting, the fact remains that most cars require quite a bit of prep work before they are ready to receive said coating. This means scrubbing down surfaces with a clay bar, a ton of isopropyl alcohol spraying and microfiber polishing, and hours/dollars burnt, as ceramic coating takes a back seat to surface prep. Don’t believe us? Ask any professional ceramic coating installer, and they’ll agree that prep time always adds the most zeros to a final bill.

Speaking of time. On average, the installation of a pro ceramic coating takes around five days to complete. Naturally, this time frame can be reduced drastically if the car’s paintwork is in pristine condition, or if the vehicle in question is small of stature. Yet even then, chances are you are still going to have to cough-up a few grand for your professional ceramic coating install, and here’s why.

Let’s say a professionally installed ceramic coating package like Ceramic Pro Gold runs you upwards of $2,000 when installed by a licensed specialist. But halfway through the clay bar decontamination phase, the installer discovers that your entire rear quarter panel is oxidized to hell and back. This translates to a full paint correction procedure, which for the average car owner, is entirely too steep to justify, especially when combined with the initial two grand invested in surface prep and the ceramic coating itself.

Professional Ceramic Coating Costs

Ceramic Pro Prices

Opticoat Ceramic Coating Costs

DIY Ceramic Coating Kits

Cost: $20 – $150

Most people can’t afford a pricey pro ceramic coating, and instead have to opt for a product that is designed to appeal to the average DIY enthusiast. While a professional cleaning and install will almost always render the best results, it is hard to ignore the value associated with applying a ceramic coat on one’s own.

The benefits of opting for a DIY ceramic coating kit go well beyond value too. These specially formulated chemical blends are far less finicky than professional-grade car coatings, therefore making them an ideal option for the common car owner. However, it is important to note that quality, durability, and longevity all correlate to the hardness grade associated with the ceramic product being used, so opting for a ceramic coating with a 9H hardness rating will always yield the best long term results.

Interestingly enough, the biggest complaint people have about a DIY ceramic coating isn’t so much the product itself, but the poor customer support and vague installation instructions that go along with it. In contrast, the highest rated consumer-grade ceramic coating on the market, AvalonKing’s Armor Shield IX, comes with detailed instructions, superior customer service, easy-to-understand ordering recommendations, and an unbeatable money-back guarantee. AvalonKing has even gone as far as publishing a set of guidelines for properly preparing a car’s paintwork for ceramic coating, along with various application tips and tricks, and maintenance and after-care advice.

Spray Coating For Cars Repels Water And Dirt — Here's How

Perhaps the most notable ceramic coating benefit, is its water displacing/hydrophobic capabilities. As this video, and numerous others illustrate, water, and all of the dirt, grime, and gunk that is encapsulated within it, quickly bead-up and roll off. Thus leaving the ceramic coated side of the car almost completely devoid of liquid.

Why Not Wax?

While wax may add a lustrous level of shine to a car’s paintwork, it falls short in both staying hard for prolonged periods of time. Yes, we know it may sound like an erectile dysfunction infomercial, but natural carnauba, spray waxes, and ceramic waxes only for a while before they go limp. Simply put, the protective layer they provide is not nearly as permanent as a true ceramic coating, and will not protect surfaces from things like scratches and falcon feces.

While the up-front cost of a DIY ceramic coating may be more expensive than the average car wax, the superior levels of protection it offers are clear. Factor in the amount of time and money spent on stripping and reapplying car wax every month, and a ceramic coating’s benefits become even more obvious.

Further Reading:

How it Works

FAQ

Common Ceramic Coating Myths

"Myths" and "Facts" direction signs.

Myth #1: A Ceramic Coat Will Make a Car Bulletproof

The varying levels of hardness associated with automotive ceramic coating products are all registered on a numbered scale, just like our neighbor’s parole officer visitation days. While people are quick to associate these numbers with the MOHS (mineral hardness scale), all ceramic car coating products are tested on the common pencil hardness scale. Therefore, a 9H ceramic coat rating does not correlate to nearly diamond level hardness levels, but the amount of pressure the coating can withstand before a mark or line can be seen.

While this may do jack-shit to protect your car’s hood from that boulder that just fell out of the bed of the dump truck in front of you, it can help in other areas. 9H hardness levels do wonders for preventing small scratches, scuffs, swirl marks, and road debris from cutting into, or embedding into clear coat.

Myth #2: A Ceramic Nano Coating Doesn’t Need Maintenance

Despite having superior hardness and water repelling properties, the average ceramic paint coating still needs to be cleaned regularly. So while you may not be able to prevent road grime, pollen, avian fecal matter, and various other contaminants from caking onto your car, at least there is a way to make clean-up far less frequent and labor-intensive.

Myth #3: A Ceramic Paint Coating is Permanent

Although a ceramic coating forms a semi-permanent bond with a vehicle’s paintwork, glass, plastic, or clear coat, this sacrificial layer is by no means an indestructible coat of armor. Over time, the molecular structure of even the hardest 9H-rated ceramic coating will begin to deteriorate, at which point it is best to strip the coat entirely, and reapply a fresh layer. That said, a well-made ceramic coating product typically provides 2 years worth of protection at the bare minimum, especially when properly applied and cared for by the consumer.

Myth #4: Ceramic Coating is Easy to Apply

While DIY ceramic coating kits feature an application process that is relatively easy, the amount of prep time required prior to installation is quite time consuming. Surface blemishes, clear coat oxidation, and paint correction must all be attended to ahead of applying a ceramic coating. Remember, once cured, a genuine ceramic coating product will become semi-permanent, so it is best to do your prep work properly the first time to avoid any regrets down the line. Just like marriage prenups…

Myth #5: Ceramic Coatings Hide Imperfections

While ceramic coatings will give a much smoother look to surfaces, they do little to hide things like faded paint, swirl marks, scratches, obscenities scribbled in permanent marker, or any other notable blemish. Regardless as to whether it is attractive or not, what you see on your car’s surface gets locked into place once a ceramic coating cures, therefore making said imperfection all the more noticeable. So be sure to make sure that surface is looking exactly the way you want it to look before locking it semi-permanently in place with a ceramic coating.

Quick Nerd Note: Perhaps the most notable nano ceramic coating benefit, is its water displacing/hydrophobic capabilities. As numerous videos have illustrated in the past, water, and all of the dirt, grime, and mud that come with it bead-up and roll off, leaving the car’s paint almost completely devoid of liquid. So beware of “ceramic” spray-on products that depend heavily on polymers to replicate hydrophobic attributes, for they are notorious for having poor durability and piss-poor longevity.

Frequently Asked Questions and Ceramic Coating FAQs

Warning about spray-on ceramic products.

"Remember, not all ceramic coatings are created equal, especially when it comes to their hydrophobic coating water displacement capabilities. Many ceramic spray products my boost an easy spray-on application process and superior water disbursement properties, but they often rely heavily upon polymers, and therefore do not last very long."

1. How long does ceramic coating last when properly applied to a vehicle’s paintwork?

Although a high-quality DIY ceramic coating like Armor Shield IX is guaranteed to provide protection for 2 years, there have been many reports of it lasting as long as 5 years. In order to achieve this level of extended longevity, the following three factors must first be present.

Proper Prep Work and Application. If a ceramic coating is applied to a clean vehicle, it will always bond better, penetrate imperfections and porous areas properly, and cure harder.

Formula Quality. Not all ceramic coatings are created equal. Watered-down versions don’t adhere as well or last as long as high-end 9H formulas. A high-quality ceramic coating should always go on smoothly without appearing too watery, nor too gooey.

SiO2 Percentage. A good bottle of ceramic coating will contain at least 80% silica dioxide (SiO2). The stronger the SiO2 dosage, the harder the ceramic coating will cure, which in turn helps boost durability.

2. How do you remove ceramic coating from a car?

Removing ceramic coating is rarely as easy as its application, but with the proper tools and a cold six pack, this task can be accomplished in anyone’s garage on a Sunday. But fair warning friends. While a chemical stripper specifically designed for ceramic coating removal may appear to be the easiest route, the acidic nature of these chemicals can cause damage to softer surfaces like tires and door moldings, so proceed with caution.

The best approach is to wait until your car’s ceramic coating is on its last leg, and use a clay bar or clay mitt to scrape away the thin layer residing on the surface. You can also go the paint correction route, and put an approved polishing compound and a power buffer tool to work. Just don’t get carried away, because you might cut into your car’s clear coat.

3. How do you maintain a ceramic coating?

The best way to keep a ceramic coated vehicle looking sharp is to regularly hand wash the entire vehicle with water and a pH neutral car shampoo. Make sure that your shampoo does not contain any waxes or sealants either, and use the two-bucket hand washing technique every other week.

Applying a high-quality SiO2 ceramic boost spray to your freshly washed machine every other month will go a long way to boosting the longevity of that ceramic coating as well. This slick, stackable layer rests on top of the existing ceramic coating, and negates the need for removal. Going this route not only significantly extends the life of a DIY ceramic coating, but it also adds additional depth and shine to the paint below.

4. What is ceramic coating made of?

In order for ceramic coating to form a layer of protection on a surface, it must contain the appropriate ingredients in carefully measured amounts. Once this balance has been achieved, the coating can then penetrate all of the microscopic imperfections lurking beneath the surface.

The main ingredient in any true ceramic coating is silica dioxide or SiO2, which as we mentioned earlier, should make-up at least 80% of the formula. However, there is a point where too much SiO2 will turn the ceramic coating viscous, thus making it difficult to apply. A good rule of thumb is to avoid products boasting an SiO2 rating of 85% or above. Other ingredients commonly found in ceramic coatings include titanium dioxide (nano TiO2), activated fluorine, silicon brightening particles, polysilazane, triethanolamine, and water.

5. How many layers of ceramic coating does a car need?

Nano ceramic coatings don’t layer well, so properly applying a ceramic coating to a car’s finish the first time should be all that is needed. The only reason why people tend to coat a vehicle twice, is to guarantee that no areas were missed during the first application.

6. Can you apply wax over a ceramic coating?

Applying car wax to a fresh ceramic coating is like putting vinyl wrap over a $20,000 paint job. It might help protect the coating itself, but it will also negate the hydrophobic properties that make ceramic coating so special. In turn, this will make the vehicle a magnet for all of the contaminants you wish to avoid, so skip the wax, and opt for a ceramic booster instead.

Parting Shots

Buffing a car headlamp.

A ceramic paint coating not only offers rock-hard paint protection, but hydrophobic/water-repellent properties as well. This transparent layer of armor resists UV rays, repels road grime, and prevents scratches, chemicals, extreme heat, and swirl marks from eating into your car’s paintwork. When properly applied and cared for, this semi-permanent ceramic shield will last for years, requiring little more than a quick rinse when dirtied.

If money is of no concern, and protecting your show machine at all costs is the objective, having a professionally installed ceramic car coating applied to your vehicle is the best option. The peace of mind associated with this service, along with the meticulous attention to detail that a trained ceramic coating installation professional provides, offers more benefits than we can mention.

But for most of us, coughing-up a few grand for the installation of a ceramic coating for our daily beater is completely out of the question, leaving the DIY ceramic coating kit as the next best option. And while it may take a bit of elbow grease, and some TLC once installed, the perks to DIY coating a car far outweigh its initial cost and required care.

Still not sure whether ceramic coating is right for your ride? AvalonKing’s Armor Shield IX ceramic coating DIY kit currently has a 4.8/5 positive rating score after 1,800+ reviews, and offers a 2-year guarantee with every kit, all for just $69.99.

Shining car that has had ceramic coating applied to bodywork to protect paint.

If you enjoyed this article, then you'll love AvalonKing's automotive care products for Do-It-Yourselfers. We create "No B.S. products" for an affordable price. And the best part, we treat our customers like family, so if you have any questions or just looking to chat about cars, we're only an email or call away. Check out our homepage here.

434 comments

Dan

Dan

Will a ‘Clear Bra’-type ppf product apply satisfactorily over your product, or should it be applied first, and then your product to the remaining surfaces? Thanks!

Will a ‘Clear Bra’-type ppf product apply satisfactorily over your product, or should it be applied first, and then your product to the remaining surfaces? Thanks!

Tim C

Tim C

Hi Chris:

Yes – Armor Shield IX works on vinyl and PPF.

Hi Chris:

Yes – Armor Shield IX works on vinyl and PPF.

Chris

Chris

Good day…I have a black gloss car with a charcoal matte wrap stripe down the middle….can you ceramic coat directly over the 3M matte charcoal wrap stripe?

Good day…I have a black gloss car with a charcoal matte wrap stripe down the middle….can you ceramic coat directly over the 3M matte charcoal wrap stripe?

Tim C

Tim C

Hi Brian:

Thanks for the question. Yeah, unfortunately, you’ll have to strip the M26 BEFORE applying a nano ceramic coating. The product works best by penetrating those microscopic imperfections on porous surfaces. If it’s got wax on top – the coating can’t do that. The best way to remove new wax is a two-step approach. First, use a decontamination car shampoo that is a detergent – or has a pH about 9. The second step would be to clay bar the car – using plenty of lube spray.

Second – (1) bottle would be close. Since the roof is glass – use the coating on the roof and glass as well. I’d recommend (2) and don’t be shy about using the formula.

Hi Brian:

Thanks for the question. Yeah, unfortunately, you’ll have to strip the M26 BEFORE applying a nano ceramic coating. The product works best by penetrating those microscopic imperfections on porous surfaces. If it’s got wax on top – the coating can’t do that. The best way to remove new wax is a two-step approach. First, use a decontamination car shampoo that is a detergent – or has a pH about 9. The second step would be to clay bar the car – using plenty of lube spray.

Second – (1) bottle would be close. Since the roof is glass – use the coating on the roof and glass as well. I’d recommend (2) and don’t be shy about using the formula.

Brian K

Brian K

Hi. A month ago I detailed my car myself (first timer) including clay, polish and lastly M26 mirror glaze carnauba wax blend. Wish I had known about ceramic coating before. But at least most of the base work is done.
Q1: How should I apply ceramic coating now? Apply on top or remove the wax first? How? Suggestions please.
Q2: Would one bottle be enough for my vehicle if I am careful? Audi Q5, contrary to belief it is a small SUV, bit smaller than BMW X3 and much smaller than the Accord. Approx 70% of the roof is glass and hardly any painted trunk area as it is mostly tail lights.
Thank you!

Hi. A month ago I detailed my car myself (first timer) including clay, polish and lastly M26 mirror glaze carnauba wax blend. Wish I had known about ceramic coating before. But at least most of the base work is done.
Q1: How should I apply ceramic coating now? Apply on top or remove the wax first? How? Suggestions please.
Q2: Would one bottle be enough for my vehicle if I am careful? Audi Q5, contrary to belief it is a small SUV, bit smaller than BMW X3 and much smaller than the Accord. Approx 70% of the roof is glass and hardly any painted trunk area as it is mostly tail lights.
Thank you!

Panagiotis

Panagiotis

Hey i wanted to ask if ceramic coatings last in high heat and strong sun??

Hey i wanted to ask if ceramic coatings last in high heat and strong sun??

Dale Pearl

Dale Pearl

Hi Panagiotis!
Absolutely! Armor Shield works great under high temps and in direct sunlight!

Hi Panagiotis!
Absolutely! Armor Shield works great under high temps and in direct sunlight!

Tim Charlet

Tim Charlet

Hi Peggy:
Thanks for the question. As long as your polished aluminum on the travel trailer does not have an existing coating on top of it, you can and should use a ceramic coating to protect it. That would look wicked awesome – so if you do, and you use Armor Shield IX, we’d love to see the finished product!

Hi Peggy:
Thanks for the question. As long as your polished aluminum on the travel trailer does not have an existing coating on top of it, you can and should use a ceramic coating to protect it. That would look wicked awesome – so if you do, and you use Armor Shield IX, we’d love to see the finished product!

Peggy

Peggy

Can I put the ceramic coating on mirror finish aluminum, like my airstream, to help the mirror finish last longer and keep the seams sealed up better?

Can I put the ceramic coating on mirror finish aluminum, like my airstream, to help the mirror finish last longer and keep the seams sealed up better?

Tim Charlet

Tim Charlet

Hi Ally:

Thanks for contacting us today. If you’ve paint corrected or polished your ride, it is a great idea to complete a final wipe down using an Isopropyl Alcohol or IPA surface prep spray. Now, with the current COVID-19 climate, IPA is running short on production. So, If you can’t find an IPA surface spray to remove the residual polish compound, I would recommend washing your car one final time, with a wax stripping shampoo. We’ve got one coming soon – so make sure to follow our Facebook page to know when and how you can pick it up.

Hi Ally:

Thanks for contacting us today. If you’ve paint corrected or polished your ride, it is a great idea to complete a final wipe down using an Isopropyl Alcohol or IPA surface prep spray. Now, with the current COVID-19 climate, IPA is running short on production. So, If you can’t find an IPA surface spray to remove the residual polish compound, I would recommend washing your car one final time, with a wax stripping shampoo. We’ve got one coming soon – so make sure to follow our Facebook page to know when and how you can pick it up.

Tim Charlet

Tim Charlet

Hi Edward:

It’s best to let your paint cure for at least a month before applying any paint protection product. Prep work is very simple in this application. Just wash (using the two bucket method) with a degreasing car shampoo, dry, wipe the surface with an IPA Isopropyl Alcohol spray solution (30% IPA / 70% distilled water), then you’re ready.

Hi Edward:

It’s best to let your paint cure for at least a month before applying any paint protection product. Prep work is very simple in this application. Just wash (using the two bucket method) with a degreasing car shampoo, dry, wipe the surface with an IPA Isopropyl Alcohol spray solution (30% IPA / 70% distilled water), then you’re ready.

Ally

Ally

Hello. After polishing my car to apply the Armor shield coating , i want to know if it is necessary to wash the car before applying the coating ?
Should i removed all the compound before applying the coating?
If yes, could u please advised me how to well removed the compound?
Which product u advised me to use for well removing the compound?
Thanks

Hello. After polishing my car to apply the Armor shield coating , i want to know if it is necessary to wash the car before applying the coating ?
Should i removed all the compound before applying the coating?
If yes, could u please advised me how to well removed the compound?
Which product u advised me to use for well removing the compound?
Thanks

EDWARD COYLE

EDWARD COYLE

hi i recently had the car painted.3 weeks ago.how long would you wait to do this.how would i prep it.there has been nothing put on the paint since it was painted thanks

hi i recently had the car painted.3 weeks ago.how long would you wait to do this.how would i prep it.there has been nothing put on the paint since it was painted thanks

Tim Charlet

Tim Charlet

Hey Kelly:

It’s very hard to guarantee the durability of a ceramic coating for more than 2 years, mainly because the resistance, hydrophobic properties, etc. will wear off due to usage, exposure, care, and even the prep work, or method it’s applied. There are also multiple variables that can accelerate or reduce wearing, that are very hard to predict.

We can’t really speak to the quality or integrity of other products. I would recommend researching more in depth about any professional grade ceramic coating. Also, make sure to review the language in lifetime guarantees, to make sure you feel comfortable.

Hey Kelly:

It’s very hard to guarantee the durability of a ceramic coating for more than 2 years, mainly because the resistance, hydrophobic properties, etc. will wear off due to usage, exposure, care, and even the prep work, or method it’s applied. There are also multiple variables that can accelerate or reduce wearing, that are very hard to predict.

We can’t really speak to the quality or integrity of other products. I would recommend researching more in depth about any professional grade ceramic coating. Also, make sure to review the language in lifetime guarantees, to make sure you feel comfortable.

Kelly Reese

Kelly Reese

What is the advantages of getting a lifetime versus a 1-5 year protection? What is better Ceramic Pro 9 H or IGL

What is the advantages of getting a lifetime versus a 1-5 year protection? What is better Ceramic Pro 9 H or IGL

Dale Pearl

Dale Pearl

Hi Hector! The price of having a professional apply it varies greatly from state to state and country to country. The big cities such as Los Angeles tend to be substantially higher in application costs than say Santa Fe.

Hi Hector! The price of having a professional apply it varies greatly from state to state and country to country. The big cities such as Los Angeles tend to be substantially higher in application costs than say Santa Fe.

Dave

Dave

Do not use this product on bmw frozen paint!

Do not use this product on bmw frozen paint!

Hector

Hector

If I wnat to have the product professionally applied, what would be the average cost to do that?

If I wnat to have the product professionally applied, what would be the average cost to do that?

Tim Charlet

Tim Charlet

Hi Gennaro:

Yes – Armor Shield IX works on any type of paint.

Hi Gennaro:

Yes – Armor Shield IX works on any type of paint.

Gennaro

Gennaro

Is this item safe to use on BMW Frozen paints? If not, do you have a product that is safe to use on BMW Frozen paint?

Is this item safe to use on BMW Frozen paints? If not, do you have a product that is safe to use on BMW Frozen paint?

Harry

Harry

Will this product accept heat transfer dye sublimation inks?

Will this product accept heat transfer dye sublimation inks?

Dale Pearl

Dale Pearl

Hello Harry!

No, not a good idea. All dye’s or sublimation should be applied to the original surface first. Afterward, you can apply Armor Shield.

Hello Harry!

No, not a good idea. All dye’s or sublimation should be applied to the original surface first. Afterward, you can apply Armor Shield.

Dale Pearl

Dale Pearl

Hi Pablo!

That is correct! Armor Shield works great on both plastic and glass headlights!

Hi Pablo!

That is correct! Armor Shield works great on both plastic and glass headlights!

Dale Pearl

Dale Pearl

Hi there!

We have many customers in India and they love the product. Armor Shield works spectacularly in high-temperature environments. Unless you are talking about long term exposure to temps over 500 degrees you should be fine.

Hi there!

We have many customers in India and they love the product. Armor Shield works spectacularly in high-temperature environments. Unless you are talking about long term exposure to temps over 500 degrees you should be fine.

Carl Kessler

Carl Kessler

ERic
Can your product be applied to aluminum. I am a sailor and have been looking for a slick surface that can be applied in the sail slot of a mast. Being in a sea environment salt and dirt build in the slot when the sail is down at dock. And makes it hard to raise the main sail. I have considered Teflon but it does not last very long. So I have been looking at the nano technology.
Carl

ERic
Can your product be applied to aluminum. I am a sailor and have been looking for a slick surface that can be applied in the sail slot of a mast. Being in a sea environment salt and dirt build in the slot when the sail is down at dock. And makes it hard to raise the main sail. I have considered Teflon but it does not last very long. So I have been looking at the nano technology.
Carl

Dale Pearl

Dale Pearl

Hi Carl!

Armor Shield works great on aluminum, bare metal, chrome, carbon fiber, and even matte paint surfaces. Now, one thing to mention is that long term exposure to salt spray may diminish the longevity of the product, however, I would anticipate it lasting longer than Teflon but we would need to do specific testing in order to make that assumption factual.

Hi Carl!

Armor Shield works great on aluminum, bare metal, chrome, carbon fiber, and even matte paint surfaces. Now, one thing to mention is that long term exposure to salt spray may diminish the longevity of the product, however, I would anticipate it lasting longer than Teflon but we would need to do specific testing in order to make that assumption factual.

Auto Herb

Auto Herb

I am planning to do a ceramic coating form my Mercedes e-class here in Pune – India. But wondering how long it would last considering the harsh summers of this region of India.

I am planning to do a ceramic coating form my Mercedes e-class here in Pune – India. But wondering how long it would last considering the harsh summers of this region of India.

Pablo

Pablo

You say headlights, the same coating for paint can be used for the plastic headlights?

You say headlights, the same coating for paint can be used for the plastic headlights?

Jim

Jim

My order number is ******. I have not received the shipping data for my product.

Reply

Hi Jim!
We emailed you a link by which to track your package.

Dale (Customer Support)

My order number is ******. I have not received the shipping data for my product.

Reply

Hi Jim!
We emailed you a link by which to track your package.

Dale (Customer Support)

Dale Pearl

Dale Pearl

Hi Barry!
You can actually do it either way or both but most apply Armor Shield after applying the bra in order to add some protection to the wrap or bra.

Hi Barry!
You can actually do it either way or both but most apply Armor Shield after applying the bra in order to add some protection to the wrap or bra.

Barry Stombaugh

Barry Stombaugh

I have a new car that I will be adding a clear bra (xpel or 3M) and graphic stripes. Should I wait until these are applied before I ceramic coat the finish?

I have a new car that I will be adding a clear bra (xpel or 3M) and graphic stripes. Should I wait until these are applied before I ceramic coat the finish?

Tim Charlet

Tim Charlet

Hi Brad:
Thanks for contacting us today. I think you’ll get a lot of answers to your question in this blog I wrote a few months ago. https://avalonking.com/blog/ceramic-pro-vs-diy-ceramic-coatings-breaking-down-the-facts/ – if you review this, and still have more questions, feel free to contact us and we’ll try to provide more depth.

Hi Brad:
Thanks for contacting us today. I think you’ll get a lot of answers to your question in this blog I wrote a few months ago. https://avalonking.com/blog/ceramic-pro-vs-diy-ceramic-coatings-breaking-down-the-facts/ – if you review this, and still have more questions, feel free to contact us and we’ll try to provide more depth.

Eric Williams

Eric Williams

For sure. You can actually do coats with just a bit of a break in between… Like an hour. But letting it fully cure definitely has its advantages as well.

For sure. You can actually do coats with just a bit of a break in between… Like an hour. But letting it fully cure definitely has its advantages as well.

Brad

Brad

Hi there I have an Audi SQ5 and had System X applied to it. I heard that is the best product available can you comment on the quality difference between this and Amor Shield and what differentiates the level of quality of cheap Chinese versions through to high end products ?
Thanks

Hi there I have an Audi SQ5 and had System X applied to it. I heard that is the best product available can you comment on the quality difference between this and Amor Shield and what differentiates the level of quality of cheap Chinese versions through to high end products ?
Thanks

Richard Armstrong

Richard Armstrong

Eric – just applied a coat and waiting 24 hours in the garage for it to dry…should I now be able to add another coat?

Eric – just applied a coat and waiting 24 hours in the garage for it to dry…should I now be able to add another coat?

Frank DAngelo

Frank DAngelo

We recently bought a black F-150 and had vinyl lettering applied. It looks amazing. I am a bit concerned down the road if there will be fading if we a few years from now remove the vinyl. For this reason, and to keep the truck looking great, we want to apply a ceramic coating. I mostly want a degree of UV protection. Do ceramic coatings also have some UV protection? Thank you in advance for your help.

We recently bought a black F-150 and had vinyl lettering applied. It looks amazing. I am a bit concerned down the road if there will be fading if we a few years from now remove the vinyl. For this reason, and to keep the truck looking great, we want to apply a ceramic coating. I mostly want a degree of UV protection. Do ceramic coatings also have some UV protection? Thank you in advance for your help.

Dale Pearl

Dale Pearl

Hi Jessica!

Armor Shield itself doesn’t alter or change color. It enhances the existing surface. If the coating is too shiny for you the only recourse would be to remove the coating. The industry-standard method of removing a ceramic coat would be by taking a fine polish to all the coated areas. The abrasive nature of polishing will remove the entirety of Armor Shield.

Hi Jessica!

Armor Shield itself doesn’t alter or change color. It enhances the existing surface. If the coating is too shiny for you the only recourse would be to remove the coating. The industry-standard method of removing a ceramic coat would be by taking a fine polish to all the coated areas. The abrasive nature of polishing will remove the entirety of Armor Shield.

Dale Pearl

Dale Pearl

HI Lu!

I assume you mean a decal. If it is a decal on the painted surface then Armor Shield will work perfectly to protect the decal and help prevent premature peeling.

HI Lu!

I assume you mean a decal. If it is a decal on the painted surface then Armor Shield will work perfectly to protect the decal and help prevent premature peeling.

Jessica Kang

Jessica Kang

Hi there. We just had our new car ceramic coated at the insistence of my husband (new Ford Expedition). The problem is that the clear ceramic coat has now completely changed the color finish of the car. It had been a dark graphite grey with some metallic visible and now it looks like it’s all metallic gloss. I actually absolutely hate it and want to know how can we restore it to what the original paint color looked like. Does the sheen wear off enough to not be so brilliant? We specifically got this color because of the stealth edition and the darker grey. Now it looks silver and I’m so frustrated.

Hi there. We just had our new car ceramic coated at the insistence of my husband (new Ford Expedition). The problem is that the clear ceramic coat has now completely changed the color finish of the car. It had been a dark graphite grey with some metallic visible and now it looks like it’s all metallic gloss. I actually absolutely hate it and want to know how can we restore it to what the original paint color looked like. Does the sheen wear off enough to not be so brilliant? We specifically got this color because of the stealth edition and the darker grey. Now it looks silver and I’m so frustrated.

Lu Tib

Lu Tib

I have the US Flag on both front doors and on my hood. It’s a Jeep Wrangler not used for off roading. Can I use this with no problems?

I have the US Flag on both front doors and on my hood. It’s a Jeep Wrangler not used for off roading. Can I use this with no problems?

Clayton sims

Clayton sims

How much is it to coat the whole car

How much is it to coat the whole car

Tim Charlet

Tim Charlet

Hi Clayton:

It depends on the size of your car. If you have a two-door coupe or motorcycle, (1) kit will work. Four-door sedans and crossover SUV’s should use (2) kits, and full-size trucks or SUV’s are best for (3) kits. We offer discounts for multiple kit purchases – so check out this link https://avalonking.com/shop/armor-shield-ix-diy-kit/

Hi Clayton:

It depends on the size of your car. If you have a two-door coupe or motorcycle, (1) kit will work. Four-door sedans and crossover SUV’s should use (2) kits, and full-size trucks or SUV’s are best for (3) kits. We offer discounts for multiple kit purchases – so check out this link https://avalonking.com/shop/armor-shield-ix-diy-kit/

Eric Williams

Eric Williams

Hi Roger. There would be a benefit up to a certain point yes. With Armor Shield IX I can recommend going up to 3 coats, more than that and it would be excessive. Any car would actually be easier to prep if already coated (if you don’t want to do paint corrections as that would require the removal of the previous coating). For DIY, application on a black car actually has its benefits like it being a lot easier to see that the surface is properly coated and later buffed (this can be quite hard on a light gray color or white for example).

Hi Roger. There would be a benefit up to a certain point yes. With Armor Shield IX I can recommend going up to 3 coats, more than that and it would be excessive. Any car would actually be easier to prep if already coated (if you don’t want to do paint corrections as that would require the removal of the previous coating). For DIY, application on a black car actually has its benefits like it being a lot easier to see that the surface is properly coated and later buffed (this can be quite hard on a light gray color or white for example).

Roger

Roger

Hi Eric,
I just had a ceramic coat professionally applied to a black car. Is there benefit to adding additional layers of ceramic coating?

I was told black cars are more difficult to prep, once they have been coated, are diy applications the same as other colors?

Hi Eric,
I just had a ceramic coat professionally applied to a black car. Is there benefit to adding additional layers of ceramic coating?

I was told black cars are more difficult to prep, once they have been coated, are diy applications the same as other colors?

Tim Charlet

Tim Charlet

Hey Tony:

That depends on where the scratches are located. Quite often, the scratches are underneath the ceramic coating and were not removed prior to the application. If that’s the case, you’ll have to remove the coating, complete paint correction, and reapply. If the scratches are on the coating itself, you can resolve it just like a clear coating, using a cutting polishing compound. You’ll likely have to reapply coating to that section.

Hey Tony:

That depends on where the scratches are located. Quite often, the scratches are underneath the ceramic coating and were not removed prior to the application. If that’s the case, you’ll have to remove the coating, complete paint correction, and reapply. If the scratches are on the coating itself, you can resolve it just like a clear coating, using a cutting polishing compound. You’ll likely have to reapply coating to that section.

Tony Johnson

Tony Johnson

How do I remove scratches from a ceramic coated car?

How do I remove scratches from a ceramic coated car?

Chew

Chew

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

Eric Williams

Eric Williams

Hi Chew. Durability would heavily depend on the quality of the coating and the preparation work involved. For 6 hours, taking aside enough time to do 4 coats, I do doubt the detailing shop is planning to do enough of the prep work needed for a truly perfect result. Just washing the vehicle properly and de-contaminating the surface could take 2 hours alone, not to mention at least doing one light polishing pass…

Hi Chew. Durability would heavily depend on the quality of the coating and the preparation work involved. For 6 hours, taking aside enough time to do 4 coats, I do doubt the detailing shop is planning to do enough of the prep work needed for a truly perfect result. Just washing the vehicle properly and de-contaminating the surface could take 2 hours alone, not to mention at least doing one light polishing pass…

Chew

Chew

Hi, Eric,

Great article.

I was promised 4 layers of 9H ceramic coating with warranty for 5 years by a professional detailing shop and the job can be done in 6 hours. Is that possible? It seems to contradict what you have written and my own check tells me it is not. Happy to hear your thoughts. Thanks.

Hi, Eric,

Great article.

I was promised 4 layers of 9H ceramic coating with warranty for 5 years by a professional detailing shop and the job can be done in 6 hours. Is that possible? It seems to contradict what you have written and my own check tells me it is not. Happy to hear your thoughts. Thanks.

Tim Charlet

Tim Charlet

Hi Jerry:

Thanks for contacting us. Click this link to this recently published article for tips on removing a ceramic coating. https://avalonking.com/blog/how-to-remove-a-ceramic-coating/

Hi Jerry:

Thanks for contacting us. Click this link to this recently published article for tips on removing a ceramic coating. https://avalonking.com/blog/how-to-remove-a-ceramic-coating/

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